Tuesday, December 7, 2010

muro torto





The Muro Torto (meaning, "askew wall") is an ancient Roman supporting wall located behind the Pincian hill, that cuts through the Villa Borghese, running all the way from Via Veneto to the Piazza del Popolo. 

Don't be fooled by this picture, weekday traffic here is always bumper-to-bumper. There are actual sayings to that effect, like for example, "Jammed like the Muro Torto at rush hour..." or, "Growing old on the Muro Torto," etc. I'm kidding, the maxims don't exist. But the traffic is indeed very real.

The wall–dating to the end of the Republican era (509 BC to 27 BC)–supports the sloping hillside that once housed many patrician mansions, like the ones belonging to the Anicii, the Acilii and Pinci families.

The wall was later included in the monumental Aurelian Wall complex; and in the late 1800s this is where suicide victims, thieves, vagabonds and prostitutes were buried.

For more interesting history and lore surrounding the Muro Torto, you can read this very well-written article (in Italian) by Domenico Augenti.

21 comments:

  1. Yes, I do remember being in that traffic, "the walls", thank you for sharing such an interesting area!

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  2. Muro Torto is just...so roman...!

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  3. Molto interessante la storia !!!

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  4. Ugh, I expect to see a movie one of these days with these views, and the characters and stories evoked here.

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  5. It would be an interesting movie, lakeviewer!

    I found the exact spot on Google Map. I love learning about the arteries through the old body of an ancient city. With repair over time, the lifeblood--made of the people of Rome--is still flowing.

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  6. CChuck~
    Surviving Muro Torto traffic is something you can never forget...

    ~~~
    Valeria~
    Yes, indeed!

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    Andras~
    I'm happy you liked it.

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    Rosaria~
    Of 1800s Papal Rome? There have been made, and they are beautiful.

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  7. I love your new banner photo. I need to figure out which churches they are.

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  8. Oh! Those are the three churches at Piazza del Populo, and the Pantheon on the right.

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  9. Jeff~
    I'm happy you like hanging out here!
    The 3 central domes belong to S. Agnese in Agone, Sant'Andrea della Valle and San Carlo ai Catinari. See the spiral of Sant'Ivo alla Sapienza? (4th in series).
    The Piazza del Popolo twins are not in this photo. They are out of the frame, to the far right beyond the Pantheon. To the opposite side, far left (out of frame) is St. Peter's.

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  10. Your banner image is breathataking! This blog is always filled with the most interesting photographs! Thanks for sharing.

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  11. It amazes me how easily ancient architecture exists with the modern world. You painted this vignette so beautifully!

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  12. Bella~
    Thank *you* for your kind words!

    ~~~

    Carmi~
    That's Rome in a nutshell. Thank you!

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  13. Echoing Carmi's comment..This is interesting - the stillness of old vs the rush of new somehow melded together in this beautiful image. Hope your flight over here is smooth and look forward to chatting! ciao Leslie

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  14. Oooh, I love old walls! Good thing I do not drive past them. I would stop my car just to gaze and cause a traffic jam for miles.

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  15. Muro torto! Just like in the portuguese writing. :-)
    Beautiful old walls!

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  16. Ooh, I was not even close! All those domes are on or near Piazza Navona.

    Don't lose faith in me, I'm learning!

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  17. Ah! And the buildings in the foreground are on Lungotevere Ripa / Porto di Ripa Grande. Ok, now I understand.

    I need to learn more about the hills...

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  18. Leslie~
    Thank you! Me too! A presto...

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    Bella~
    Maybe that's why all the traffic jams there... people like us, that like to stop and gaze at old walls!

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    JM~
    obrigado! :)

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    Jeff~
    This is an unusual perspective, looking north essentially. Yes, the hills are important!

    Ciao a tutti

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  19. How wonderfully ancient and intriguing with that history. I love pictures and stories like this.

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  20. Great view of the slice of breathtaking city. Good to see your new posts.

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  21. T.Becque~
    I'm happy you enjoyed it! Cheers

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    Irina~
    Nice to see you here! Grazie

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Thank you for visiting Roma Every Day. Your feedback is always hugely appreciated, though it is no longer possible for me to reply individually to your comments in the post thread.

For any questions, please feel free to send me an email.

Grazie!
~Eleonora

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